Module Benchmark

module Benchmark: sig .. end
Benchmark running times of code.

This module implements benchmarking functions for measuring the run-time of one or many functions using latency (multiple repetitions) or throughput (repeat until some time period has passed) tests.

Examples: Run the function f with input 5000 for 10 iterations and print the CPU times:

    Benchmark.latency1 10 f 5000                        

Run the tests foo, bar and baz three times for at least 8 seconds each, printing the results of each test, and then print a cross tabulation of the results:

    open Benchmark
    let res = throughputN ~repeat:3 8 [("foo", foo, 1000000);
                                       ("bar", bar, 2000000);
                                       ("baz", baz, 3000000); ] in
    print_newline();
    tabulate res                                                    

Time how long it takes to some piece of code:

    let t0 = Benchmark.make 0L in
    (* do something here *)
    let b = Benchmark.sub (Benchmark.make 0L) t0 in
    print_endline "Benchmark results:";
    print_endline (Benchmark.to_string b)                       



Timing and samples structures


type t = {
   wall : float; (*
Wallclock time (in seconds)
*)
   utime : float; (*
This process User CPU time (in seconds)
*)
   stime : float; (*
This process System CPU time (in seconds)
*)
   cutime : float; (*
Child process User CPU time (in seconds)
*)
   cstime : float; (*
Child process System CPU time (in seconds)
*)
   iters : Int64.t; (*
Number of iterations.
*)
}
The information returned by timing tests.
type style = 
| No_child (*
Do not print child CPU times
*)
| No_parent (*
Do not print parent CPU times
*)
| All (*
Print parent and child CPU times
*)
| Auto (*
Same as No_child unless there is child CPU used
*)
| Nil (*
Print nothing
*)
Style of the output.
val make : Int64.t -> t
Benchmark.make n create a new Benchmark.t structure with current time values and n iterations. Only the integer part of n is used, the fractional part is ignored.
val add : t -> t -> t
Benchmark.add b1 b2 add Benchmark.t structure b1 to b2.
val sub : t -> t -> t
Benchmark.sub b1 b2 subtract Benchmark.t structure b2 from b1.
val to_string : ?style:style ->
?fwidth:int -> ?fdigits:int -> t -> string
Benchmark.to_string ?style ?fwidth ?fdigits b converts the Benchmark.t structure to a formatted string.
style : printing style (default: Auto)
fwidth : number of chars reserved for the numbers (default: 5)
fdigits : number of fractional digits of the numbers (default: 2)
type samples = (string * t list) list 
Association list that links the names of the tests to the list of their timings.
val merge : samples -> samples -> samples
merge l1 l2 merges the two association lists of timings l1 and l2 into a single one, concatenating the timings for the same names of l1 and l2.

Timing functions


val throughputN : ?min_count:Int64.t ->
?style:style ->
?fwidth:int ->
?fdigits:int ->
?repeat:int -> int -> (string * ('a -> 'b) * 'a) list -> samples
Benchmark.throughputN ?min_count ?style ?fwidth ?fdigits t funs runs each function in list funs for at least t > 0 seconds. The list funs has the structure: [(name1, f1, x1); (name2, f2, x2); ...], where name1 is the name to label the first test, f1 is the function to run, and x1 is its input,... If ~style is not Nil, then the results are printed. Returns the resulting list which can be passed to Benchmark.tabulate if you want a comparison table.

REMARK that t is the running time of the functions, not of the repetition loop. Thus a very fast running function will need lots of repetitions to make a difference of t seconds to the empty loop. In this case, the running time of the loop will dominate the whole process which can therefore take much longer than t seconds. If you are only interested in the relative times of fast functions and not in their real running times, we recommend you wrap each of them in a loop.

min_count : a warning will be printed if the number of runs is less than min_count. This is a first defense against meaningless results. (default: 4L)
style : printing style (default: Auto)
fwidth : number of chars reserved for the numbers (default: 5)
fdigits : number of fractional digits of the numbers (default: 2)
repeat : number of times each function running time is measured. The default is 1 to be compatible with the former version of this library but it is highly recommended to set it to a higher number to enable confidence statistics to be performed by Benchmark.tabulate.
val throughput1 : ?min_count:Int64.t ->
?style:style ->
?fwidth:int ->
?fdigits:int ->
?repeat:int -> int -> ?name:string -> ('a -> 'b) -> 'a -> samples
Benchmark.throughput1 ?min_count ?style ?fwidth ?fdigits t ?name f x runs one function f with input x for at least t seconds, and returns the result, which is also printed unless ~style is Nil. See Benchmark.throughputN for more information.
val latencyN : ?min_cpu:float ->
?style:style ->
?fwidth:int ->
?fdigits:int ->
?repeat:int ->
Int64.t -> (string * ('a -> 'b) * 'a) list -> samples
Benchmark.latencyN ?min_cpu ?style ?fwidth ?fdigits n funs runs each function in list funs for n iterations. n must be at least 4. The list funs has the structure: [(name1, f1, x1); (name2, f2, x2); ...], where name1 is the name to label the first test, f1 is the function to run, and x1 is its input,... If style is not Nil, then the results are printed. Returns the results list, which can be passed to Benchmark.tabulate if you want to print a comparison table.
Raises Invalid_argument if n < 4L.
min_cpu : a warning will be printed if the total CPU time is less than min_cpu. This is a first defense against meaningless results (default: 0.4).
style : printing style (default: Auto).
fwidth : number of chars reserved for the numbers (default: 5).
fdigits : number of fractional digits of the numbers (default: 2).
repeat : number of times each function running time is measured. The default is 1 to be compatible with the former version of this library but it is highly recommended to set it to a higher number to enable confidence statistics to be performed by Benchmark.tabulate.
val latency1 : ?min_cpu:float ->
?style:style ->
?fwidth:int ->
?fdigits:int ->
?repeat:int ->
Int64.t -> ?name:string -> ('a -> 'b) -> 'a -> samples
Benchmark.latency1 ?min_cpu ?style ?fwidth ?fdigits n ?name f x runs the function f with input x for n iterations, and returns the results, which are also printed unless ~style is Nil. See Benchmark.latencyN for more information.
val tabulate : ?no_parent:bool -> ?confidence:float -> samples -> unit
Benchmark.tablulate results prints a comparison table for a list of results obtained by Benchmark.latencyN or Benchmark.throughputN with each function compared to all the others. The table is of the type

            Rate name1 name2 ...   OR          s/iter name1 name2 ...
        name1  #/s    --   r12             name1   #       --   r12
        name2  #/s   r21    --             name2   #      r21    --
        ...                                ...                            

where name1, name2,... are the labels of the tests sorted from slowest to fastest and rij says how much namei is faster (or slower if < 0) than namej (technically it is equal to (ri - rj) expressed in percents of rj where ri and rj are the rates of namei and namej respectively).

If several results are associated to a given name, they are used to compute a Student's statistic to check whether the rates are significantly different. If ri and rj are not believed to be different, rij will be printed between brackets.

no_parent : if true, only take in account the times of the children (default: false).
confidence : is used to determine the confidence interval for the Student's test. (default: 0.95).

Benchmark Tree

Naming benchmarks within a hierarchy that allows to run them all, or filter them so that only a subset is run.

module Tree: sig .. end